4th of July History and Traditions

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For many families, the Fourth of July is a holiday full of traditions, some of which have been passed down from generation to generation. Let’s take a look at some of some of our favorite traditions. Please comment below to let us know what you think.

history.com
history.com

The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution.

On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson.

From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues.

infoplease.com
infoplease.com

Following its adoption, the Declaration was read to the public in various American cities. Whenever they heard it, patriots erupted in cheers and celebrations.

In 1777, Philadelphians remembered the 4th of July. Bells were rung, guns fired, candles lighted, and firecrackers set off. However, while the War of Independence dragged on, July 4 celebrations were modest at best.

When the war ended in 1783, July 4 became a holiday in some places. In Boston, it replaced the date of the Boston Massacre, March 5, as the major patriotic holiday. Speeches, military events, parades, and fireworks marked the day. In 1941, Congress declared July 4 a federal holiday.

mywarminghouse.com
mywarminghouse.com

Put Out a Flag. Show some patriotism and love for this great country we live in.

Also you can hang up the American flag. Make you think about our freedoms even if it is for a short period of time. You can check proper flags made in the USA.

befunky.com
befunky.com

When I was little I remember seeing the well-known Cool Whip flag cake in one of my grandma’s magazines and I begged her to let me make it. Of course she let me. I was so proud of that cake and I know it is a cake that makes an appearance in 4th of July celebrations all over the country. I made a smaller version a few years ago – not a flag, but the same idea. Blueberries and strawberries are an essential part of the 4th around here.

inquisitr.com
inquisitr.com

From midnight parades to ones that happen at a more decent hour, Americans love parades. In good weather, small towns and large cities across America line the streets to see floats, horses, cheerleaders, military units, and marching bands pass by, often waving flags as participants hand out candy.

Also The most unique of these parades is, perhaps, the Bristol Fourth of July Parade, held in Bristol, Rhode Island. With its inception in 1785, it is the oldest 4th of July celebration in the United States.

nbcnews.com
nbcnews.com

In John Adams’ ill-fated prediction about the significance of July 2, he said America’s birthday should be marked by “games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other.”

Also the holiday has always been celebrated with bright lights, big bangs and fire. Artillery salutes using cannons and explosives left over from wars were the preferred method of American celebration in the country’s earliest days, Heintz notes in the “Encyclopedia.”

This year, 14,000 fireworks displays will take place around the Fourth of July, according to the American Pyrotechnics Association. APA Executive Director Julie Heckman calls the day the “bread and butter for the industry.”

“I don’t think the industry would have survived without the Fourth of July,” she said. “Without the Fourth of July people wouldn’t want to buy consumer fireworks.”

As a result Fireworks and Sky Lanterns are becoming a major showcase in today’s celebration.

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