5 Steps To Get Off The Couch And Get Addicted To Running

0
626

Here are 5 steps to get off the couch and get addicted to running. Please comment below to let us know what you think.

livestrong.com
livestrong.com

If you’ve never run before, don’t worry, because the best way to begin running is to walk. “Walking strengthens the muscles and tendons so your body can handle running’s impact,” said Andrew Kastor, head coach of the High Sierra Striders in Mammoth Lakes, California.

Don’t rush this adjustment phase. One of the biggest mistakes new runners make is thinking that all cardio is the same, and if you’ve strengthened your heart and lungs with one activity, you’ll be fit enough to jump right in to another.

Unfortunately, your body doesn’t work that way. Even if you’re a pro on the bike or have logged long hours on the elliptical, you should still ease into running. “You need to give your joints and ligaments time to catch up to your heart and lungs or you risk injury,” said Kastor.

Your best bet is to gradually build up to 30 minutes of brisk walking two to four times a week. Regardless of your starting point, you should be able to reach this goal in two weeks. Then you can try “run-walking,” where you alternate between five minutes of running and one minute of walking. Keep up that cycle for 30 minutes, and perform the workout up to four times a week for three weeks.

mindbodygreen.com
mindbodygreen.com
mindbodygreen.com
mindbodygreen.com

When I go for a run, I leave my iPod, my laptop, my phone (unless I’m in an unfamiliar area), and all other technologies that we’re constantly bombarded with and I just go.

I listen to my surroundings: the birds chirping, the owls hooting, the wind blowing. Leaving the technology at home and focusing on the here and now is 100 percent worth it.

When I run, I notice my body tensing up and my thoughts getting jumbled. I actively tell myself to breathe, to smile. I take a huge breath and enjoy the run and the endorphins running free.

attendly.com
attendly.com

The goal of weight loss can be a big motivator for some people, but it often doesn’t stand the test of time. Eventually you lose motivation to keep your workouts up. Instead, start focusing more on performance.

View each run as a way to improve your physical conditioning level and try setting a goal to achieve each time you head out. Remember this goal should be something that you can easily accomplish with just a little effort. Try shaving a minute off your time for instance or running a quarter of a mile further than you did before.

When you gain a greater sense of purpose from your runs, it’ll help keep you coming back for more. Plus, by setting and achieving all these smaller goals, it’ll add up and you’ll see significant progress in a month or two’s time.

rivertea.com
rivertea.com

There is nothing wrong with running or needing to run. Addiction to running is a positive thing as it reliefs stress and helps you lose weight. Most runners, though, say their passion goes beyond the obvious benefits any new beginner would consider when deciding to take it up. The strongest motivation lies in the intense exhilaration and euphoria that come after a run.

What actually happens is that the nervous system releases a beta-endorphin, intended to alleviate the pain, but actually creates the feeling of extreme happiness. So you get an intense high and you want more of it each day. The addiction was confirmed by researchers at Tufts University through a study done on rodents. Through an intense running regimen, they proved the brain can release chemicals that mimic the same buzz as opiate use.

It makes you feel good and it burns fat. It’s the perfect exercise and it’s basically free. Surely there is more to it, then just gratification. Let’s see 360 outline of how it affects you.

runnersworld.com
runnersworld.com

If you’ve been working out regularly, you’ve already discovered it: No matter how good or bad you feel at any given moment, exercise will make you feel better. And it goes beyond just the “runner’s high”—that rush of feel-good hormones known as endocannabinoids. In a study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, researchers found that even a single bout of exercise—30 minutes of walking on a treadmill—could instantly lift the mood of someone suffering from a major depressive order.

And even on those days when you have to force yourself out the door, exercise still protects you against anxiety and depression, studies have shown. Moderate exercise may help people cope with anxiety and stress even after they’re done working out. A 2012 study in the Journal of Adolescent Health proved that just 30 minutes of running during the week for three weeks boosted sleep quality, mood, and concentration during the day.

 

LEAVE A REPLY